Barriers of Professional Autonomy among Arab-Speaking Countries during Covid-19 Pandemic

  • Zahra Abbas Department of Adult Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Basra, Basra, Iraq.
  • Sadeq AL-Fayyadh Chairman, Department of the Adult Nursing, College of Nursing, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq.

Abstract

Objectives: The aims of the study are to determine barriers of nursing autonomy among Arab-Speaking countries during Covid-19 pandemic and to determine difference in professional autonomy levels among Arab-Speaking countries and work place.
Methods: Data collected from December 12 2020 to March 15 2021 by Google form survey. Cross-sectional design was used in the present study .A purposive sample of 708 nurses who had met the study's inclusion criteria were targeted. Data were analyzed through the use of IBM-Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17, in which descriptive and inferential statistical measures were employed.
Results: The results of the study showed no deference in professional autonomy among Arab speaking countries P =0.826 and work place (P=0.826). Most common barriers of professional autonomy are absence of law protecting professional duties(35.6%)  which was perceived by of the study subjects, followed by the policy of health (30.4%),followed by hospital administration style (26.4%) and domination or physicians authority (29.9%).
Conclusion: Most common barriers of professional autonomy are absence of law protecting professional duties, the policy of health care sector, domination of physician’s authority and hospital administration style. This result reflects highlights the importance of removing all obstacles to upgrade nurse’s professional autonomy in the covered Arab-speaking counties.
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Published
2021-06-26
How to Cite
ABBAS, Zahra; AL-FAYYADH, Sadeq. Barriers of Professional Autonomy among Arab-Speaking Countries during Covid-19 Pandemic. Journal of Contemporary Medical Sciences, [S.l.], v. 7, n. 3, june 2021. ISSN 2413-0516. Available at: <http://www.jocms.org/index.php/jcms/article/view/1004>. Date accessed: 16 sep. 2021. doi: https://doi.org/10.22317/jcms.v7i3.1004.
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