Evaluation the Effect of Royal Jelly on the Growth of Two Members of Gut Microbiota; Bacteroides fragillis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

  • Vida Kazemi Medicinal Plants Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mojtaba Mojtahedzadeh Department of Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Seyed Davar Siadat Microbiology Research Center (MRC), Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.
  • Abbas Hadjiakhondi Medicinal Plants Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Abdulghani Ameri Department of food and drug control, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
  • Sara Ahmadi Badi Microbiology Research Center (MRC), Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.
  • Azadeh Manayi Medicinal Plants Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mahdi Bagheri Department of Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Objective: In this study the effect of Royal jelly on the growth of two important members of Bacteroides spp.; Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, was evaluated. Also the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity effects of Royal jelly on Caco-2 cell line as gastrointestinal epithelial cell model, assessed.
Methods : Bacteria, Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron were grown on brain heart infusion (BHI) broth medium supplemented with Royal jelly in 3 different concentrations (2.5, 5 and 10% v/v), both of the bacteria (1.5×108 cfu/mL) were inoculated to BHI broth contained Royal jelly in anaerobic condition. To calculate the bacterial optical density (OD), the absorbance was measured at 600 nm after an overnight. Also Caco-2 cells, was used to study the effects of Royal jelly on epithelial cell viability, and the Physicochemical properties consist of  total proteins, polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, total lipids, ash and moisture by UV-VIS spectrophotometric and gravimetric methods were evaluated .
Results: The growth of B. fragillis and B. thetaiotaomicron were increased by Royal jelly (2.5, 5 and 10% v/v concentrations) and the results indicated that Royal jelly increased the growth of bacteria in a dose dependent manner (p<0.001). In addition MTT assay showed more than 95% viability of Caco-2 cells treated with Royal jelly. The Iranian Royal jelly sample contains 59.01% water, 11.57% proteins, 12% lipids, 12.63 % polysaccharide and 5% mineral.
Conclusion: The present study showed that Royal jelly has a potential effect in the  preserving gut microbiota  and it is suggested that Royal jelly as a complementary and alternative medicine can be used to treatment diseases are associated  with gut microbiota- host interactions and immune regulating. Although we need to expand our knowledge by designing clinical trials to confirm the therapeutic effects of Royal jelly on gut microbiota modulation as a barrier function.
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Published
2019-02-26
How to Cite
KAZEMI, Vida et al. Evaluation the Effect of Royal Jelly on the Growth of Two Members of Gut Microbiota; Bacteroides fragillis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Journal of Contemporary Medical Sciences, [S.l.], v. 5, n. 1, feb. 2019. ISSN 2413-0516. Available at: <http://www.jocms.org/index.php/jcms/article/view/518>. Date accessed: 23 mar. 2019.